Thursday, September 30, 2010

Tony Avella on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview former New York City Council member Tony Avella, who is running for the New York State Senate in the 11th SD. The seat is currently held by Republican State Senator Frank Padavan. We discussed housing, senior services, the MTA, the budget deficit, teacher tenure, public pensions and how he plans to reform Albany if he is elected. Tony is also in favor of bringing back the commuters tax. I also asked Tony how Carl Paladino being at the top of the Republican ticket will help him in his race.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Gary Axelbank on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview Gary Axelbank who is the host of the TV program Bronx Talk. Gary and I discussed the results of the Democratic primaries in the Bronx, the 16th anniversary of the program, and his take on the issues currently affecting the Bronx, like education, crime, the Kings bridge armory development and the Hunts point market. I also asked Gary to compare the old Bronx political leadership to the new leadership.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Following the city wide election night part 3.

New York city holds elections for city offices every four years. This year New Yorkers are voting for mayor, public advocate, comptroller. There will also be local elections for borough president and city council members.

The mayor is the Chief Executive Officer on New York. The Mayor’s duties include appointing and removing agency heads and commissioners for mayoral agencies and many public authorities, and proposing a city budget.

The Comptroller is the city’s Chief Financial Officer. The Comptroller’s responsibilities include auditing city agencies and investigating all matters concerning the city’s finances.

The Public Advocate act as a “watchdog” or go-between. The job of the Public advocate includes monitoring the operation of the public information and service complaint programs of city agencies and investigating. In the mayor’s absence, the Public Advocate acts as the mayor.

Destination Casa Blanca New York Politics Edition will bring you a special live edition with the latest analysis of the city wide election night, giving special attention to the mayoral election. What can Latino New Yorkers anticipate for the next four years?

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Scott Levenson on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview Political consultant Scott Levenson. I invited Scott on as a guest to discuss the results of the primary races. We discussed the AG's race, Carl Paladino's victory and how he would advise Attorney General Cuomo. We also discussed the Democratic party strategy on a national level and will the Democrats hold on to their majority.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Roberto Perez on Bronx Talk

On Monday night I was a guest on the TV program Bronx Talk with host Gary Axelbank. The other guest was David King from the Gotham Gazette. Topics of discussion were the primary election results, Assemblyman Nelson Castro's victory over District leader Hector Ramirez and Gustavo Rivera's victory against Pedro Espada.

Sunday, September 19, 2010

Following the city wide election night part 2.

New York city holds elections for city offices every four years. This year New Yorkers are voting for mayor, public advocate, comptroller. There will also be local elections for borough president and city council members.

The mayor is the Chief Executive Officer on New York. The Mayor’s duties include appointing and removing agency heads and commissioners for mayoral agencies and many public authorities, and proposing a city budget.

The Comptroller is the city’s Chief Financial Officer. The Comptroller’s responsibilities include auditing city agencies and investigating all matters concerning the city’s finances.

The Public Advocate act as a “watchdog” or go-between. The job of the Public advocate includes monitoring the operation of the public information and service complaint programs of city agencies and investigating. In the mayor’s absence, the Public Advocate acts as the mayor.

Destination Casa Blanca New York Politics Edition will bring you a special live edition with the latest analysis of the city wide election night, giving special attention to the mayoral election. What can Latino New Yorkers anticipate for the next four years?

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Joe Crowley on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview Congressman Joe Crowley a while back. It is interesting because this interview was conducted the day after the New Hampshire primary, when then Senator Hillary Clinton pulled out an upset against Senator Obama.
We discussed his background, the war in Iraq, and he even sung some Springsteen at the end.

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Following the city wide election night.

New York city holds elections for city offices every four years. This year New Yorkers are voting for mayor, public advocate, comptroller. There will also be local elections for borough president and city council members.

The mayor is the Chief Executive Officer on New York. The Mayor’s duties include appointing and removing agency heads and commissioners for mayoral agencies and many public authorities, and proposing a city budget.

The Comptroller is the city’s Chief Financial Officer. The Comptroller’s responsibilities include auditing city agencies and investigating all matters concerning the city’s finances.

The Public Advocate act as a “watchdog” or go-between. The job of the Public advocate includes monitoring the operation of the public information and service complaint programs of city agencies and investigating. In the mayor’s absence, the Public Advocate acts as the mayor.

Destination Casa Blanca New York Politics Edition will bring you a special live edition with the latest analysis of the city wide election night, giving special attention to the mayoral election. What can Latino New Yorkers anticipate for the next four years?

Friday, September 10, 2010

Against All Odds, Monserrate Still In The Fight

From the outside Francisco Moya’s effort to represent the 39th Assembly district in Queens looks as easy as getting a carnitas taco in Jackson Heights.

His contender in the Democratic Primary, Hiram Monserrate, was recently convicted of domestic assault and expelled from the New York State Senate. Monserrate was also one of the four Democrats who blocked the Senate last summer, a move that many of his fellow party members won’t forgive. On top of that, he campaigned saying he supported gay marriage, but ended up voting against it.

Moya, on the other hand, has a clean record and all the endorsements that any candidate could dream of, including a big group of female Democratic elected officials (he is even supported by City Councilmember Julissa Ferreras, who once opposed him in a race for Council). As he likes to point out, he’s been working for the community since the age of 15, he grew up in the district and says he will bring back the integrity and dignity that Corona, Jackson Heights and Elmhurst have lost.

Yet, most experts say the race is very close.

“We have to understand that Hiram Monserrate is a candidate that has won (against) great odds in previous elections,” said Carlos Vargas-Ramos, from the Center of Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College. Vargas-Ramos says that even though Moya has the support of the Queens political machine, he is not as well known as Monserrate or Jose Peralta who took Monserrate’s seat in the Senate. But Vargas-Ramos does think Monserrate has lost a lot of his old base, particularly within the LGBT community, female voters, and South American immigrants who won’t support him after the violent episode with his girlfriend Karla Giraldo, who is Ecuadorian.

Furthermore, the 39th district has a history of low voter turnout in the elections and even though more than half of the Democratic voters are Hispanics (20,649 of 35,345), only 2,186 voted on average in the three last primaries, according to the Voter Activation Network.

On the streets of the district, most people don’t even know an election is coming next Tuesday, and those who do are divided. Some vow they will never vote for Monserrate again, but his supporters say everyone makes mistakes and that if his girlfriend forgave him, why shouldn’t they after all he has done for the community?

People in the district say they are worried about how dirty the streets are, the number of street vendors on Roosevelt Avenue and about crime. Orlando Tobón, an important Colombian leader in the district, says another issue is people who are abusing immigrant newcomers. He says fake immigration lawyers, curanderos (local witchdoctors) and even churches are taking money from immigrants and cheating them.

Both Moya and Monserrate have spoken about crime and dirty streets, but the main issues in their campaigns are education, affordable housing, health care, creating new jobs and fighting for immigrant rights.

Tobón thinks a lot of people won’t vote for either candidate because they are tired of the way the Democrats have been ruling the district without responding to its needs. “Should we have to become Republicans to be heard?” he said (which is precisely what Colombian Humberto Suarezmotta, the Republican candidate for the contested seat did) .

Moya says the reason people are not voting is because they are tired of corruption:

“We have two totally different persons here. A person that is corrupt, that represents everything that is wrong with the government right now, that has been expelled… I haven”t even been expelled from a school, I have never been arrested. If you talk with anyone they will tell you that I’ve lived an honest life, that I’m someone who really loves his community.”

Monserrate admits he made a mistake, but he says he is the only one who has really been there for the people. “I had a difficult moment in my personal life, we all make mistakes, but that has nothing to do with my job for the community,” he said.

Radio host Roberto Pérez says Monserrate did a lot of things for the people of the district because he had a lot of resources for a long time. And, he adds, people don’t forget when someone helped them. But he thinks the negative campaign literature being distributed by Moya’s campaign (and the negative reports in the media) will eventually make the difference in this election, and just as when Peralta won the seat against Monserrate, when more than 15,000 voters turned out, a lot of people will go out and vote against him.

Catalina Jaramillo is a reporter with El Diario. Feet in Two Worlds coverage of the New York Primary is supported, in part, by the New York Community Trust.

Levine y Espaillat luchan por el distrito 31 - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com


I was quoted in El Diario La Prensa discussing the race in the 31st SD.
Levine y Espaillat luchan por el distrito 31 - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Ken Padilla on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview District Leader Ken Padilla, who represents the 76th AD. We discussed his District Leader race against State Senator Ruben Diaz Sr. His removal from the community board, the race between Luis Sepulveda and Assemblyman Peter Rivera, and the endorsement he received from Congressman Joe Crowley.

Llegan las elecciones - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com


I was quoted in El Diario La Prensa, discussing what voters should look for when choosing a candidate.
Llegan las elecciones - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com

Distrito 32: David vs. Goliat - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com


I was quoted in El Diario La Prensa today, discussing the race in the 32nd SD between Senator Ruben Diaz Sr. and Charlie Ramos. Here is the link to the article.
Distrito 32: David vs. Goliat - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Israel Cruz on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview Israel Cruz who is running for the New York State Assembly in the 85th AD. The seat is currently held by Assemblyman Marcos Crespo. We discussed Israel's work in the district, the reasons why he is running for office, and the issues of day which include the budget deficit, crime, the MTA, and what he plans to do for the constituents of the district if he is elected.

Evette Zayas on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview Evette Zayas, who is running for the New York State Assembly in the 68th AD. The seat is currently held by Assemblyman Adam Clayton Powell IV. We discussed unemployment, crime, affordable housing, senior services, and education. We also discussed the platforms of her opponents Robert Rodriguez and John Ruiz.

Una lucha cerrada por el distrito 33 - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com


I was quoted in El Diario La Prensa, discussing the race in the 33rd SD between Senator Pedro Espada, and Gustavo Rivera
Una lucha cerrada por el distrito 33 - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Latino political power part 4.

The growing Latino population not only consist of a large number of registered voters, but it also includes high-spending consumers, private executives, and most notably, an increasing number of congress members, mayors, and other elected and appointed officials. In the particular case of New York, Latino immigrant groups in New York have elected representatives to the City Council and State Assembly within a generation of having a sizable presence in the United States, hence proving their growing political power.

Saturday, September 4, 2010

Doug Muzzio on THE PEREZ NOTES


This is an interview I conducted a while back with Political analyst Doug Muzzio. It is an old interview, but occasionally I like to tap into my archives.
A specialist in American public opinion, voting behavior, and city politics, Doug Muzzio has had extensive political, governmental, and media experience. He is the co-director of the Center for Innovation and Leadership in Government and the founder and former director of Baruch Survey Research, both at Baruch College's School of Public Affairs.
Muzzio is also a political analyst and on-air commentator for WABC-TV and has done polling and political analysis for ABC-TV and other news organizations for more than two decades.

Friday, September 3, 2010

Latino political power part 3.

The growing Latino population not only consist of a large number of registered voters, but it also includes high-spending consumers, private executives, and most notably, an increasing number of congress members, mayors, and other elected and appointed officials. In the particular case of New York, Latino immigrant groups in New York have elected representatives to the City Council and State Assembly within a generation of having a sizable presence in the United States, hence proving their growing political power.

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Latino political power part 2.

The growing Latino population not only consist of a large number of registered voters, but it also includes high-spending consumers, private executives, and most notably, an increasing number of congress members, mayors, and other elected and appointed officials. In the particular case of New York, Latino immigrant groups in New York have elected representatives to the City Council and State Assembly within a generation of having a sizable presence in the United States, hence proving their growing political power.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Rafael Dominguez on THE PEREZ NOTES


I had the opportunity to interview Rafael Dominguez, who is running for the New York State Assembly in the 82ND AD. The seat is currently held by Assemblyman Michael Benedetto. Topics of discussion were the demographics of the district, the budget, Assemblyman Benedetto's visibility in the district, and Rafael's reasons for running. We also discussed the dysfunctional state government, and how Ralph plans to reform it.

La campaña de Powell - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com


La campaña de Powell - El Diario La Prensa NY - noticias de Nueva York - impre.com
La carrera en el Distrito 15 del Congreso (CD) es probablemente una de las más emocionantes en las primarias próximas cuando se refiere a los votantes latinos.

Existe una dinámica fascinante en este concurso para representar a un distrito que en su mayoría son latinos.

El congresista Charles Rangel, quien ha representado el distrito en los últimos 40 años, y cuyo era puertorriqueño, nunca ha reconocido su ascendencia boricua. Ni siquiera lo menciona en su libro "No he tenido un mal día desde entonces". Rangel siempre se ha identificado como afroamericano.

Por otra parte usted tiene al asambleísta Adam Clayton Powell IV, quien se crió en Puerto Rico y habla español con fluidez. Powell IV ligeramente habla de su herencia latina. Representa al vecindario fuertemente latino de East Harlem conocido como El Barrio. Por otra parte, su legendario padre, Adam Clayton Powell Jr. fue el primer afroamericano elegido al Congreso en Nueva York. Powell Jr. encabezó la muy influyente Iglesia Bautista Abisinia y defendió los derechos civiles. Fue destronado por Rangel en 1970.

La carrera 15 del CD, que incluye el Norte de Manhattan, es considerada históricamente como un asiento afroamericano, pero el 14 de septiembre, día de las primarias, tiene dos latinos con el reconocimiento que están corriendo para un puesto más alto. Los candidatos como el asambleísta Adriano Espaillat, y el ex Comisionado de Asuntos del Inmigrante de Nueva York, Guillermo Linares tienen operaciones de movilización de votantes que aumentará la participación de latinos en el área de Washington Heights.

¿Podría el asambleísta Powell movilizar una ola latina hasta llegar al Congreso, vengar la derrota de su padre y mover el centro del poder de la decimoquinto carrera del CD de Central Harlem a El Barrio? Eso lo sabremos el próximo 14 de septiembre.

Adam Clayton Powell IV is focusing on the Latino angle

Host David Diaz and guest panelists Roberto Perez and Gail Smith discuss the political platform of Adam Clayton Powell IV on his run for the 15th Congressional District, and see him as a candidate positioning himself with Hispanic voters.